Discussion:
Future of VO
(too old to reply)
MagicFingers
2006-10-09 19:20:15 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.

What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?

best regards,

Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Jamal
2006-10-09 19:43:21 UTC
Permalink
Janno,

VO 2.8 is currently being developed. Please see:

http://www.grafxsoft.com/vo28.htm

Vulcan.NET is also being developed by a dedicated team of developers. It
will work inside VS 2005 Pro or higher and will have a transporter to import
VO code right into Vulcan projects.

Since you're an experienced developer, you may want to consider joining the
VOPS subscription service offered by Grafx. You'll have access to the latest
builds of VO and Vulcan.NET and will get direct access to developers who
will answer your questions promptly and professionally, plus you will be in
touch with many VO and Vulcan.NET developer who are member of VOPS program.
VOPS is one the life lines of VO and Vulcan.NET and I am sure any support
you give will only accelerate development and continued VO support by Grafx.

HTH,
Jamal
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Ginny Caughey
2006-10-09 19:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Janno,

Many of us who rely on VO for our work have subscribed to VOPS (Visual
Objects Platinum Subscription) which gives us regular updates to VO, the
next release of VO, the first release of Vulcan, and interim beta builds of
both products. The last new version of VO we got was Friday, and we got a
new build of Vulcan today. (I hope it's ok to say that!) VOPS provides the
money to keep VO developed, and Vulcan will provide an upgrade path for
existing VO code that doesn't involve a total rewrite. More info about VOPS
here: http://www.grafxsoft.com/vosubscribe.htm

Since you don't want to leave the VO language, this sounds like a good path
for you, but other options you might consider for new code include any of
the .NET languages like C#, which seems to be popular with VO developers as
an alternative language. You also would have the option to mix and match
Vulcan code with C# or VB or any other .NET language, and you can also call
VO library code from .NET languages using COM or using a technique called
PInvoke.
--
Ginny
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
MagicFingers
2006-10-09 20:47:57 UTC
Permalink
Hi Jamal and Ginny,

I'm happy to see that there is so much progress in VO and Vulcan. Right
know I'm really considering to take my VOPS because I'm confident,
after reading the grafix website about 2.8 and Vulcan, in the future of
VO!

One big project will be a stock maintenance programm for a furniture
company which currently runs in a Visual Basic programm with MySQL as
database.

What about VO and MySQL? I understand that the VO-SQL classes might not
be the best choice and that I should consider ADO. Is there a way to
have native support for MySQL in VO?

Best regards,

Janno
Ginny Caughey
2006-10-09 21:00:02 UTC
Permalink
Janno,

There are several people here who are experienced using VO and MySql, but
I'm not one of them. Ordinarily for Ado I'd recommend VO2Ado, but I haven't
tried it with MySql.
--
Ginny
Post by MagicFingers
Hi Jamal and Ginny,
I'm happy to see that there is so much progress in VO and Vulcan. Right
know I'm really considering to take my VOPS because I'm confident,
after reading the grafix website about 2.8 and Vulcan, in the future of
VO!
One big project will be a stock maintenance programm for a furniture
company which currently runs in a Visual Basic programm with MySQL as
database.
What about VO and MySQL? I understand that the VO-SQL classes might not
be the best choice and that I should consider ADO. Is there a way to
have native support for MySQL in VO?
Best regards,
Janno
Geoff Schaller
2006-10-09 22:11:35 UTC
Permalink
Janno,

No. You would be much better off with MS SQL Express (the free version)
to replace MySQL. The problem (in using VO) is that you would need to
using a native wrapper class for MySQL as there isn't any OLEDB support
for it to use with ADO. VO is best placed to access RDBMS with VO2Ado.

MySQL has much better support for ADO.Net but for that you need to use a
Dot net language.

In all seriousness, and mush as I hate to say it, if the app is already
written in VB and uses MySQL then you are probably better moving it to
VB.Net and using MySQL classes based on ADO.Net.

There seems little point going through the enormous work of conversion
to VO and if your aim is to go to Dot net. You would just keep it all in
VB. Is the current app working? Don't break it by trying conversion.

Geoff
Post by MagicFingers
Hi Jamal and Ginny,
I'm happy to see that there is so much progress in VO and Vulcan. Right
know I'm really considering to take my VOPS because I'm confident,
after reading the grafix website about 2.8 and Vulcan, in the future of
VO!
One big project will be a stock maintenance programm for a furniture
company which currently runs in a Visual Basic programm with MySQL as
database.
What about VO and MySQL? I understand that the VO-SQL classes might not
be the best choice and that I should consider ADO. Is there a way to
have native support for MySQL in VO?
Best regards,
Janno
mullet
2006-10-10 03:53:33 UTC
Permalink
I would agree. VB .Net would be a better way to go. I've worked in it for a
couple years now (alongside of C#) and it is not to bad once you get used to
it. It is closer to C# than VB due to all the OO features and the Framework.
Post by Jamal
Janno,
No. You would be much better off with MS SQL Express (the free version) to
replace MySQL. The problem (in using VO) is that you would need to using a
native wrapper class for MySQL as there isn't any OLEDB support for it to
use with ADO. VO is best placed to access RDBMS with VO2Ado.
MySQL has much better support for ADO.Net but for that you need to use a
Dot net language.
In all seriousness, and mush as I hate to say it, if the app is already
written in VB and uses MySQL then you are probably better moving it to
VB.Net and using MySQL classes based on ADO.Net.
There seems little point going through the enormous work of conversion to
VO and if your aim is to go to Dot net. You would just keep it all in VB.
Is the current app working? Don't break it by trying conversion.
Geoff
Post by MagicFingers
Hi Jamal and Ginny,
I'm happy to see that there is so much progress in VO and Vulcan. Right
know I'm really considering to take my VOPS because I'm confident,
after reading the grafix website about 2.8 and Vulcan, in the future of
VO!
One big project will be a stock maintenance programm for a furniture
company which currently runs in a Visual Basic programm with MySQL as
database.
What about VO and MySQL? I understand that the VO-SQL classes might not
be the best choice and that I should consider ADO. Is there a way to
have native support for MySQL in VO?
Best regards,
Janno
MagicFingers
2006-10-10 04:33:24 UTC
Permalink
Hi everybody, thanx for all the feedback!

The furniture software is writting in VB but I cannot have access to
the sources. So, there is no conversion from VB to C# or something like
that. It will be a complete rebuild from scratch. Looking to VOPS and
Vulcan I think I'll decide to do the rewrite in VO/Vulcan.

Because there's a three year history of data stored in MySQL-databases
it seems to me the most logical way to reuse that data (in a more
normalized structure). These mysql databases are stored on 4 seperate
FreeBSD Firewalls on different locations (divisions of the company) for
which I'm the maintainer. I would like to use that already existing
infrastructure of course .

If I interprete you're suggestions right it would be best to look to
Vulcan. Are there some whitepapers that, as non-VOPS member at the
moment, I can have access too?

Best regards,

Janno
Graham McKechnie
2006-10-10 05:39:54 UTC
Permalink
Janno,
Post by MagicFingers
Looking to VOPS and
Vulcan I think I'll decide to do the rewrite in VO/Vulcan.
That would be a bad move. Why waste your money joining VOPS on an unproven,
yet to be seen, yet to be delivered Vulcan.

Since you are going to have do a rewrite, because of no source to convert,
now is the perfect time to move to .Net and C#. Maybe even VB if you want,
but coming from VO I'd think you'd pick up C# faster. There is no point in
waiting for Vulcan, because no one can tell you or is willing to tell you
when it will be ready.

MySql will be fine under .Net and C#. I've already done one app using C# and
MySql and their .Net provider. Worked exactly the same as the MS Sql code,
so there is no problem there. However as Geoff stated you may want to
consider Sql Express as well.

With C# and MS Visual Studio you could start today and with any luck you'll
probably be finished by the time Vulcan is released.

I think even any of the VO diehards around here (i.e. the "clubbies"), if
they are honest would have to agree with that recommendation. Try asking
Ginny again, now that she knows all the facts.

Graham
Post by MagicFingers
Hi everybody, thanx for all the feedback!
The furniture software is writting in VB but I cannot have access to
the sources. So, there is no conversion from VB to C# or something like
that. It will be a complete rebuild from scratch. Looking to VOPS and
Vulcan I think I'll decide to do the rewrite in VO/Vulcan.
Because there's a three year history of data stored in MySQL-databases
it seems to me the most logical way to reuse that data (in a more
normalized structure). These mysql databases are stored on 4 seperate
FreeBSD Firewalls on different locations (divisions of the company) for
which I'm the maintainer. I would like to use that already existing
infrastructure of course .
If I interprete you're suggestions right it would be best to look to
Vulcan. Are there some whitepapers that, as non-VOPS member at the
moment, I can have access too?
Best regards,
Janno
Stavros Spanos - www.orbit.gr
2006-10-10 06:35:59 UTC
Permalink
Janno
Post by Graham McKechnie
Post by MagicFingers
Looking to VOPS and
Vulcan I think I'll decide to do the rewrite in VO/Vulcan.
That would be a bad move. Why waste your money joining VOPS on an unproven,
yet to be seen, yet to be delivered Vulcan.
I don't know if Graham had the VOPS experiance, but I do 2 years now
and I don't regret it at all! (and I don't deal with Vulcan - just VO32
yet...)

Also we work with SQL and ODBC using traditional VO SQL Classes for
years now with great success, so I think this could also be an
alternative with MySQL in your case.

Cheers

Stavros
Ales Zevnik
2006-10-10 07:40:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham McKechnie
That would be a bad move. Why waste your money joining VOPS on an unproven,
yet to be seen, yet to be delivered Vulcan.
With C# and MS Visual Studio you could start today and with any luck you'll
probably be finished by the time Vulcan is released.
He, he, if I understand Graham, that would also be - never?

Janno, you're an experienced VO developer (1.0 and on). Me too. And I
will
continue to work with VO. I'' have a look at Vulcan (why not?). And I'm
looking at C# as well.
And MS SQL (Express, Server, Everywhere...). But consider something
else.
Do your customers use MS Office, SBS, Sharepoint? How about integrating
document processing vith your app. In my early (fresh mech.ingeneer,
before VO) days I worked as project (and production) manager in machine
and furniture factories and know that document, production and
inventory control is essential.

OK. That's I would do: Make an app in VO using MS SQL etc... Then learn
.Net, Vulcan(?) or C# and rewrite (redo, upgrade) an app. It's a normal
production cycle....

Greetings from Slovenia, Ales
Jürgen Knauf
2006-10-10 09:30:01 UTC
Permalink
Hello Janno,

for me, the best way was to join to VOPS.

I have a lot of VO Code to convert and VULCAN seems to be the solution for
me.
Also VOPS is cheaper than buying VO 2.8 und Vulcan separated and
additionally you get a lot of more things und support..

Juergen
Post by Ales Zevnik
Post by Graham McKechnie
That would be a bad move. Why waste your money joining VOPS on an unproven,
yet to be seen, yet to be delivered Vulcan.
With C# and MS Visual Studio you could start today and with any luck you'll
probably be finished by the time Vulcan is released.
He, he, if I understand Graham, that would also be - never?
Janno, you're an experienced VO developer (1.0 and on). Me too. And I
will
continue to work with VO. I'' have a look at Vulcan (why not?). And I'm
looking at C# as well.
And MS SQL (Express, Server, Everywhere...). But consider something
else.
Do your customers use MS Office, SBS, Sharepoint? How about integrating
document processing vith your app. In my early (fresh mech.ingeneer,
before VO) days I worked as project (and production) manager in machine
and furniture factories and know that document, production and
inventory control is essential.
OK. That's I would do: Make an app in VO using MS SQL etc... Then learn
.Net, Vulcan(?) or C# and rewrite (redo, upgrade) an app. It's a normal
production cycle....
Greetings from Slovenia, Ales
MagicFingers
2006-10-10 19:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Woah, I'm overwhelmed with the support to my question! I know many of
you or even worked together with a few of you and I'm happy to see that
you all embrace VOPS! That makes my decision a lot easier now and soon
you'll see me as a VOPS memer too!

Thanx to all of you,

Janno
Geoff
2006-10-10 22:14:50 UTC
Permalink
Janno.

Not all people embrace VOPS. You have only heard from a small quantity
of people and having paid their money, they feel obliged to support
their decision <g>. There are also a lot of the original VOPS
subscribers who never renewed their subscription because they became
disillusioned with the lack of support for VO. Those who are focused on
Vulcan are relatively satisfied. I think that is a fair and accurate
statement.

If your decision is to use Vulcan then I would recommend it. Just be
aware that it is a very small community with little likelihood of
growth.

If you haven't made a decision on what to develop with I would counsel
caution about choosing Vulcan. If you have a lot of code to convert then
Vulcan seems to me to be a waste of time because I don't think
conversion is useful or necessary in a majority of instances.

Geoff
Post by MagicFingers
Woah, I'm overwhelmed with the support to my question! I know many of
you or even worked together with a few of you and I'm happy to see that
you all embrace VOPS! That makes my decision a lot easier now and soon
you'll see me as a VOPS memer too!
Thanx to all of you,
Janno
Markus Feser
2006-10-11 06:36:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by MagicFingers
Woah, I'm overwhelmed with the support to my question! I know many of
you or even worked together with a few of you and I'm happy to see that
you all embrace VOPS! That makes my decision a lot easier now and soon
you'll see me as a VOPS memer too!
Thanx to all of you,
Janno
Hello Janno,

good decision!

I have now nearly 1 year membership to VOPS. Next week the contract is ending.
The plan was to take one year, get all the patches for VO and the current Vulcan build.

After one year, I can't live without VOPS <g> so I had renewed my contract for one more year.
A lot of people are there, and it seems that there are coming more and more...

Don Caton (Vulcan) and Robert van der Hulst (VO) are very committed there!
It makes joy to see the further developed of VO and Vulcan .

Nice, we will see us there

Regards,
Markus Feser
r***@googlemail.com
2006-10-12 08:11:56 UTC
Permalink
Janno

Geoff says only 100 people will take up Vulcan.

I think that there are many many more people who will do that - the
people who use VO but dont post, and many are still happy with 2.5b3 or
2.6.

our production software is in 2.6. its stable. it works, so there is no
reason to change.

we are doing a very major upgrade in 2740, and hope to have that ready
for 2.8. these things take YEARS. these new additions need what is now
stable in 2740. when was the last time MS did anything on time ?

the world goes around once every 24 hours (well about) and thats it.

so stick with vo - 2740 -> 2.8 -> vulcan - the path is clear.

regards

richard
Don Caton
2006-10-12 13:56:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@googlemail.com
so stick with vo - 2740 -> 2.8 -> vulcan - the path is clear.
Richard:

A few words of encouragement and faith mean far more than a thousand
words of condemnation, and I just wanted to say that it's appreciated.

--
Don
Vulcan.NET Development
r***@googlemail.com
2006-10-14 14:40:09 UTC
Permalink
Don

Well it is meant ....

If you could also add in an auto port from dbf to sql then i might
decide not to retire in 10 yrs time !

r
Stephen Quinn
2006-10-15 07:13:11 UTC
Permalink
Richard
Post by r***@googlemail.com
If you could also add in an auto port from dbf to sql then i might
decide not to retire in 10 yrs time !
I doubt that's a function of a compiler (of any language)

You can do it in a few lines of code yourself.
Eg
USE XYZ
DBCOPYDELIM( 'XYZ.CSV' )
CLOSE

// Whatever you use to connect/open the SQL database
// Import from xyz.csv // use whatever is applicable for the backend

Some of the data types aren't going to have a 1-1 relationship though (RDBMS
dependent), so your better off writing your own importer and/or exporter to get
100% compatability between the database types (for your application).

HTH
Steve
Johan Nel
2006-10-15 07:07:16 UTC
Permalink
Richard,
Post by r***@googlemail.com
If you could also add in an auto port from dbf to sql then i might
decide not to retire in 10 yrs time !
That can be done even in VO.

In the Standard MDI Sql example, you have the code to create a SQL Table
from DBF. To populate the SQL Table from DBF is not too much work, even
using the standards SQL Classes of VO.

If you took my approach that I followed of DataDriving all my Database
interfaces, its even easier.

FileOpen(<cFileID>[, <cOrdName>, <aFldFilter>, <lShared>, <lReadOnly>])
-> DataServer

I have tables to define the following:

FLD -> All field specs
FILEINFO -> Table definitions (paths/ODBC/ADO connection, TableName, etc)
INDEXINFO -> All indexes with for each SQL Table/DBF File
FSTRUCT -> Table Structures, called by FileOpen automatically if not found.
ENTITYREL -> Table defining the relationships between tables

To write therefor some wrapper functions around all these is not much of
a hassle, mine is less than 1000 lines of code and that includes
import/export to any Database platform (within some limitations
obviously) and even allows me to have the same application running on
different database platforms for different clients.

So in conclusion, you can do all that even today and ensure you don't
retire in 10 years<VBG>, I am obviously not going to....

Johan Nel
Pretoria, South Africa.
Rene J. Pajaron
2006-10-12 14:35:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@googlemail.com
Geoff says only 100 people will take up Vulcan.
And he knows them by first name basis...
Post by r***@googlemail.com
Janno
Geoff says only 100 people will take up Vulcan.
I think that there are many many more people who will do that - the
people who use VO but dont post, and many are still happy with 2.5b3 or
2.6.
our production software is in 2.6. its stable. it works, so there is no
reason to change.
we are doing a very major upgrade in 2740, and hope to have that ready
for 2.8. these things take YEARS. these new additions need what is now
stable in 2740. when was the last time MS did anything on time ?
the world goes around once every 24 hours (well about) and thats it.
so stick with vo - 2740 -> 2.8 -> vulcan - the path is clear.
regards
richard
E®!k V!sser
2006-10-10 06:41:27 UTC
Permalink
Hi Janno!!
Post by MagicFingers
If I interprete you're suggestions right it would be best to look to
Vulcan. Are there some whitepapers that, as non-VOPS member at the
moment, I can have access too?
the SDN will soon publish an article about data-access with Vulcan, written
by Bert Dingemans, but you need to be a member to be able to read.
Other resources would be to join the vodc conference in Cologne next moth
and the SDE on December 11th


Erik
bert.dingemans
2006-10-14 17:53:06 UTC
Permalink
Hi Janno

Long time no see nor hear, how are you nowadays, please see my website
www.dla-os.nl for some articles about vulcan.
Post by E®!k V!sser
Hi Janno!!
Post by MagicFingers
If I interprete you're suggestions right it would be best to look to
Vulcan. Are there some whitepapers that, as non-VOPS member at the
moment, I can have access too?
the SDN will soon publish an article about data-access with Vulcan,
written by Bert Dingemans, but you need to be a member to be able to read.
Other resources would be to join the vodc conference in Cologne next moth
and the SDE on December 11th
Erik
Geoff
2006-10-10 22:05:06 UTC
Permalink
Janno.
Post by MagicFingers
The furniture software is writting in VB but I cannot have access to
the sources. So, there is no conversion from VB to C# or something like
Then that is a different story. What is your programming base in? VO? If
so then VO should be the language of your choice... unless you are
considering Dot net. In that case, C# is probably better than Vulcan
because with Vulcan you only have a fraction of the support environment
you can get with C#.
Post by MagicFingers
Because there's a three year history of data stored in MySQL-databases
it seems to me the most logical way to reuse that data (in a more
No, this is irrelevant. You can easily export the MySQL database to MS
SQL. You need to think of the customer and potential expansion. MS SQL
is quite superior to MySQL (go look at the benchmarking and comparison
sites) and offers a better path to scaling up.
Post by MagicFingers
normalized structure). These mysql databases are stored on 4 seperate
FreeBSD Firewalls on different locations (divisions of the company) for
Ok, if you are convinced to stay with MySQL then you really need C# (not
Vulcan) because of all the MySql libraries and support code out there.
None of it is written in Vulcan.
Post by MagicFingers
Vulcan. Are there some whitepapers that, as non-VOPS member at the
moment, I can have access too?
No. This is the risk you take. VO is a community of 1000's still
(although it is shrinking). Vulcan will be a community of 100 or so. At
most. You buy Visual Studio (or an MSDN subscription) and you get
significant support. You buy a VOPS subscription and get limited
support. It may be enough for some...

Geoff
Sherlock
2006-10-14 23:15:57 UTC
Permalink
Geoff,

snip[ Ok, if you are convinced to stay with MySQL then you really need
C# (not Vulcan) because of all the MySql libraries and support code
out there. None of it is written in Vulcan. ]

In .NET you used the ADO.NET connector which is FREE for "any" .NET
language.
A "SELECT" statement is a select statement at the end of the day.

This VULCAN verse C# is just non-sense.

Phil McGuinness
Graham McKechnie
2006-10-15 01:13:53 UTC
Permalink
Phil,
Post by Sherlock
A "SELECT" statement is a select statement at the end of the day.
And the code to use that select statement with .Net. .....

Oh I'm sure there will be heaps more examples in Vulcan as comapred to C#.
Gives a break Phil.... Why not give us an an example in Vulcan then?

Graham
Post by Sherlock
Geoff,
snip[ Ok, if you are convinced to stay with MySQL then you really need
C# (not Vulcan) because of all the MySql libraries and support code
out there. None of it is written in Vulcan. ]
In .NET you used the ADO.NET connector which is FREE for "any" .NET
language.
A "SELECT" statement is a select statement at the end of the day.
This VULCAN verse C# is just non-sense.
Phil McGuinness
Geoff
2006-10-15 01:08:26 UTC
Permalink
Gee Phil, for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem you can be really obtuse at times. You are
a self confessed MySQL fan so you tell me. I can find a LOT of C# and VB
samples written supporting MySQL and many on the MySQL site itself.

Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.

Select statements! Duh, Phil. As if that is all you need to write an
app...
Post by rob
Geoff,
snip[ Ok, if you are convinced to stay with MySQL then you really need
C# (not Vulcan) because of all the MySql libraries and support code
out there. None of it is written in Vulcan. ]
In .NET you used the ADO.NET connector which is FREE for "any" .NET
language.
A "SELECT" statement is a select statement at the end of the day.
This VULCAN verse C# is just non-sense.
Phil McGuinness
Sherlock
2006-10-15 03:23:41 UTC
Permalink
Geoff,

snip[ Gee Phil, for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code
samples
written to solve your problem ]
What a crock this statement. Very rare I use any code from somebody. I
like most here look to see how others do things and do it my way
generally.
--
snip[ I can find a LOT of C# and VB samples written supporting MySQL
and many on the MySQL site itself. ]

And they are SELECT and JOIN statements... big deal. One SQL is just
about the same as any other.
--
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]

.NET providor samples are .NET providor samples.. again big deal.
--
snip[ > Select statements! Duh, Phil. As if that is all you need to
write an app... ]

For some this is the basis of SQL .. Table SELECT.. etc etc etc..
Remember SQL is SIMPLE QUERY LANGUAGE and the most basic program can
grasp it or did you find it hard and think that VULCAN users would have
to switch to C# to save them the mental anxiety of such a simple
concept.

You boys are going to have to do better than this pitiful attempt.

Phil McGuinness
------
Geoff
2006-10-15 05:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sherlock
What a crock this statement. Very rare I use any code from somebody. I
<ROFL> Mr 'Has anybody got some code for..."
Post by Sherlock
And they are SELECT and JOIN statements... big deal. One SQL is just
about the same as any other.
Hmmm. This demonstrates you aren't interested in the discussion so why
waste our time. I'm not talking about SQL Phil, I'm talking about C#.
Post by Sherlock
Remember SQL is SIMPLE QUERY LANGUAGE and the most basic program can
I guess that sums up your knowledge of the subject. S = Structured.
Sherlock
2006-10-15 10:30:13 UTC
Permalink
Geoff

snip[ I guess that sums up your knowledge of the subject. S =
Structured.]

The SIMPLE is a definite descriptor of the users that can operate it.

snip[ I'm talking about C#. ]

Is this not a VO group and you are talking waffle..
Why not go to a C# group and take your discussion there.

Phil
------
Sherlock
2006-10-15 10:49:55 UTC
Permalink
Geoff

snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]

If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.

snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]

Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.

I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.

Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Geoff
2006-10-15 11:58:24 UTC
Permalink
Phil.

Calm down and take a serenity pill. Perhaps if you took just a few
seconds longer reading the original post you might understand the
context a little better. What was a very straight forward response that
NOBODY else has dissented with has been turned by you into a needless
saga.

The statement was simple and accurate: there are a lot more samples
written in C# to assist the first point of enquiry than in either VO or
Vulcan. Period. If can't deal with this concept then don't bother
responding.

Geoff
Post by Sherlock
Geoff
snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]
If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]
Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.
I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.
Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Jamal
2006-10-15 16:17:50 UTC
Permalink
Phil,

Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples. C# or VB.NET has many
samples, that's true, but so what. In .Net, code is code, the difference is
the syntax and Vulcan does that elegantly and will be the prime choice for
developers for many reasons. You can write code to deal with anything. For
MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the ConnectionString to
the correct provider with dbName and then use DbCommand class to setup your
Select , then oCon:Open( ).

Jamal
P.S. They are really strange <g>
Post by Sherlock
Geoff
snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]
If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]
Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.
I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.
Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Graham McKechnie
2006-10-16 00:34:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamal
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples.
Why not?

Interesting how you see it.

Then again why would you want to wait until Vulcan is released to learn how
to use .Net. I can't imagine every VOer becoming a .Net expert the day
Vulcan is released, hence the argument that all existing examples are C# or
VB and doing it the Vulcan way is going to mean converting C# samples to
Vulcan just to learn how to use Vulcan with .Net.

But why not go on with it (Phil preferably, because you said its only a sql
select) and show us how you would fill a say combo from the same database.

I'm sure that there are plenty of VOers who would like to see how you do it
Phil.

Jamal - Why the use of DbCommand and DbConnection?

Graham
Post by Jamal
Phil,
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples. C# or VB.NET has many
samples, that's true, but so what. In .Net, code is code, the difference
is the syntax and Vulcan does that elegantly and will be the prime choice
for developers for many reasons. You can write code to deal with anything.
For MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the
ConnectionString to the correct provider with dbName and then use
DbCommand class to setup your Select , then oCon:Open( ).
Jamal
P.S. They are really strange <g>
Post by Sherlock
Geoff
snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]
If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]
Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.
I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.
Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Jamal
2006-10-16 00:54:13 UTC
Permalink
Why the use of DbCommand and DbConnection >
These are .NET 2.0 classes. This is only one method. You can also ODBC.NET
driver. Check the MySql website for other ways! How about you post what you
have on mind (in C#) ?

Jamal
Post by Jamal
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples.
Why not?
Interesting how you see it.
Then again why would you want to wait until Vulcan is released to learn
how to use .Net. I can't imagine every VOer becoming a .Net expert the day
Vulcan is released, hence the argument that all existing examples are C#
or VB and doing it the Vulcan way is going to mean converting C# samples
to Vulcan just to learn how to use Vulcan with .Net.
But why not go on with it (Phil preferably, because you said its only a
sql select) and show us how you would fill a say combo from the same
database.
I'm sure that there are plenty of VOers who would like to see how you do
it Phil.
Jamal - Why the use of DbCommand and DbConnection?
Graham
Post by Jamal
Phil,
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples. C# or VB.NET has many
samples, that's true, but so what. In .Net, code is code, the difference
is the syntax and Vulcan does that elegantly and will be the prime choice
for developers for many reasons. You can write code to deal with
anything. For MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the
ConnectionString to the correct provider with dbName and then use
DbCommand class to setup your Select , then oCon:Open( ).
Jamal
P.S. They are really strange <g>
Post by Sherlock
Geoff
snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]
If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]
Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.
I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.
Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Graham McKechnie
2006-10-16 01:51:20 UTC
Permalink
Jamal,
Post by Jamal
These are .NET 2.0 classes.
Thanks for pointing that out.

I asked because I wondered why you where suggesting the base Db_xx classes
instead of SqlConnection or SqlCommand, or in particular for this thread
MySqlConnection and MySqlCommand.
Post by Jamal
How about you post what you have on mind (in C#) ?
But then you would have to translate it to Vulcan and that only supports my
argument - but if you like doubling your work load - why not???

The whole point of my post was to ask Phil, ("its only an Sql Select at the
end of the day") how he would do it in Vulcan. The combo was just a
suggestion, any control will do. Not much point in me posting how I do it in
C#, if Phil doesn't use C#.

I thought a Vulcan example from Phil would have been pretty educational for
other VOers who are interested in Vulcan and .Net.
Post by Jamal
Anyway, why does that matter to you? You said you're NOT interested in
Vulcan!
And before you hit me with one of these - please consider others here, who
may be trying to make up their minds, which way they should go. I'm sure
answers from Vulcan users to these questions will help them make that
decision. As a number of examples are already on the the Vulcan web site,
I'm quite certain you or Phil wouldn't be breaking your precious NDAs by
posting an example here.


Graham
Post by Jamal
Why the use of DbCommand and DbConnection >
These are .NET 2.0 classes. This is only one method. You can also ODBC.NET
driver. Check the MySql website for other ways! How about you post what
you have on mind (in C#) ?
Jamal
Post by Jamal
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples.
Why not?
Interesting how you see it.
Then again why would you want to wait until Vulcan is released to learn
how to use .Net. I can't imagine every VOer becoming a .Net expert the
day Vulcan is released, hence the argument that all existing examples are
C# or VB and doing it the Vulcan way is going to mean converting C#
samples to Vulcan just to learn how to use Vulcan with .Net.
But why not go on with it (Phil preferably, because you said its only a
sql select) and show us how you would fill a say combo from the same
database.
I'm sure that there are plenty of VOers who would like to see how you do
it Phil.
Jamal - Why the use of DbCommand and DbConnection?
Graham
Post by Jamal
Phil,
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples. C# or VB.NET has many
samples, that's true, but so what. In .Net, code is code, the difference
is the syntax and Vulcan does that elegantly and will be the prime
choice for developers for many reasons. You can write code to deal with
anything. For MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the
ConnectionString to the correct provider with dbName and then use
DbCommand class to setup your Select , then oCon:Open( ).
Jamal
P.S. They are really strange <g>
Post by Sherlock
Geoff
snip[ for the man whose constant cry is a demand for code samples
written to solve your problem ]
If you do not need code samples yourself then why promote C# with its
samples over Vulcan if you do not need them. You are a strange animal.
snip[ Please point out the similar wealth of Vulcan samples for MySQL.
]
Vulcan syntax is VO syntax essentially so you have your samples.
I use mySQL with syntax just like Dbserver with a Object class written
to given me similar syntax.
I think Geoff you are trying to make something out of nothing.. which
is about your standard.
Phil McGuinness
-----------------------
Geoff
2006-10-16 00:53:21 UTC
Permalink
Jamal,
Post by Jamal
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples.
Er... Vulcan is out and all the VOPS members have it. And yes, I would
certainly expect samples at this stage and the website even makes
reference to the same (despite how outdated it is). Also, I would
totally expect a lot samples ready for Day 1 of public release - it
would be senseless to launch such a product without them. Hence I am
expecting the beta folks to be testing these samples. Are you?
Post by Jamal
MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the ConnectionString to
the correct provider with dbName and then use DbCommand class to setup your
Select , then oCon:Open( ).
This is curious advice but no matter. I think the point I was making was
that there are C# examples you can use right out of the box to MySQL.
Write nothing. Perhaps someone should convert them to Vulcan?

Geoff
Jamal
2006-10-16 01:08:03 UTC
Permalink
VOPS members are under NDA. Vulcan.NET is beta. It will have samples in due
time that will work under Visual Studio! In fact, this is already working,
but Grafx is busy making sure the compiler is rock solid and has most of
VO's features. I wrote some samples, but I can't make them public at this
time.
Hence I am expecting the beta folks to be testing these samples. Are you?
<
Of course! <g>

Anyway, why does that matter to you? You said you're NOT interested in
Vulcan!

Jamal
Jamal,
Post by Jamal
Vulcan.NET is not out yet and they expect samples.
Er... Vulcan is out and all the VOPS members have it. And yes, I would
certainly expect samples at this stage and the website even makes
reference to the same (despite how outdated it is). Also, I would totally
expect a lot samples ready for Day 1 of public release - it would be
senseless to launch such a product without them. Hence I am expecting the
beta folks to be testing these samples. Are you?
Post by Jamal
MySql, just use the provided DbConnection class, set the ConnectionString to
the correct provider with dbName and then use DbCommand class to setup your
Select , then oCon:Open( ).
This is curious advice but no matter. I think the point I was making was
that there are C# examples you can use right out of the box to MySQL.
Write nothing. Perhaps someone should convert them to Vulcan?
Geoff
Geoff
2006-10-16 02:24:18 UTC
Permalink
Jamal,
Post by Jamal
VOPS members are under NDA. Vulcan.NET is beta. It will have samples in due
time that will work under Visual Studio! In fact, this is already working,
I wrote some samples, but I can't make them public at this time.
Samples you wrote do not come under your NDA - please read it. You are
free to publish such material because it requires a Vulcan compiler to
make use of it. In fact publishing them would make good commercial sense
to Brian because you would be demonstrating some practical positives for
Vulcan. That you would choose to not publish samples (which most people
cannot run) might indicate that problems still exist with the compiler.
Post by Jamal
but Grafx is busy making sure the compiler is rock solid and has most of
VO's features.
Actually no, I would hope GrafX was busy with both things. As we all
know there is only one compiler writer (Don) and Paul is tasked with
writing the samples and VS integration aspects. According to Ginny, Paul
is engaged full time on this so I would expect some significant output
over the 6-8 months of his engagement.
Post by Jamal
Anyway, why does that matter to you? You said you're NOT interested in Vulcan!
I'm sorry but I think you're doing a Phil on me. Do you read my posts?
Exactly where have I said I am not interested in Vulcan? In fact, I have
gone to great pains in several threads to explain that I will be
reviewing Vulcan. I will get a copy for free along with all other ex
VOPS subscribers once Vulcan goes public. And I will assess it most
thoroughly. Why wouldn't I?

Geoff

Sherlock
2006-10-09 22:13:57 UTC
Permalink
Janno

snip[ Is there a way to have native support for MySQL in VO? ]

You can use Fabs free code for this or the DEVO mySQL DBserver which is
really neat.
We use a customise version of DEVO as we bought the source. Works
well.

Phil McGuinness
------------------------
TSDing
2006-10-10 01:51:19 UTC
Permalink
Just save yourself all the future troubles, switch to C#.

Regards
Ding
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Geoff Schaller
2006-10-10 03:36:14 UTC
Permalink
In this case Ding, the code is already written in VB. Hence a move to
VB.net would be the most painless in terms of raw code conversion. Ask
Rob Panosh. He and his crew seem quite comfortable with VB.net and in
truth, there are actually some mildly better productivity tools for VB
than for C#. Surprising but true.

A competent VO'er will easily make the switch to VB, just as he could to
C#. C# appeals to me more but in reality I can read and deal with both.
If the present app is VB then I think the way forward is clear...

Geoff
Post by TSDing
Just save yourself all the future troubles, switch to C#.
Regards
Ding
rob
2006-10-10 12:51:05 UTC
Permalink
Geoff,

You are correct. Moving to Vb.Net was the best move we ever made.

Cheers,
Rob
Post by Geoff Schaller
In this case Ding, the code is already written in VB. Hence a move to
VB.net would be the most painless in terms of raw code conversion. Ask
Rob Panosh. He and his crew seem quite comfortable with VB.net and in
truth, there are actually some mildly better productivity tools for VB
than for C#. Surprising but true.
A competent VO'er will easily make the switch to VB, just as he could to
C#. C# appeals to me more but in reality I can read and deal with both.
If the present app is VB then I think the way forward is clear...
Geoff
Post by TSDing
Just save yourself all the future troubles, switch to C#.
Regards
Ding
Patrick Vletter (Prive)
2006-10-10 06:45:03 UTC
Permalink
Hi Janno,

Long time no see...
For the projects you have to maintain for the next couple of years I would
seriously advice you to look at VOPS.
It gives you access to all the latest VO32 development and the change to
interact with Robert directly if you have any problems with VO32.
We've been doing this over the last 2 years and we really got our money's
worth.

As soon as you are in VOPS you can have a personal look at Vulcan to see if
this fits your needs for your new project's. Although Vulcan is not fully
complete yet some promissing projects are already well under way. One of
them being Chris Pyrgas' Vulcan IDE. It shows that you can already easily
use the the full .NET framework to create a complex system.
On VOPS you will also have the possibility to talk to Chris and others who
are using Vulcan daily to assist you during your learning process.

CU

Patrick
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Marc Verkade (prive)
2006-10-10 08:57:59 UTC
Permalink
Hai Janno,

The VOPS builds of VO do contain lot's of enhancements.
Furthermore you can download the latest Vulcan build which is quite capable
of writing .Net in the VO-style.

As far as I can see, if you need to develop .Net app right away from
scratch, C# is the way to go.
Migrating VO to .Net and you have some time before that is nescessary, wait
for Vulcan to be released.
Wanting to do .Net, but nbot right away, I suggest you look at both Vulcan
and C# and decide for yourself what to do.

As far as I am concerned, VOPS is well worth the money!

Grtz, Marc
Post by Patrick Vletter (Prive)
Hi Janno,
Long time no see...
For the projects you have to maintain for the next couple of years I would
seriously advice you to look at VOPS.
It gives you access to all the latest VO32 development and the change to
interact with Robert directly if you have any problems with VO32.
We've been doing this over the last 2 years and we really got our money's
worth.
As soon as you are in VOPS you can have a personal look at Vulcan to see
if this fits your needs for your new project's. Although Vulcan is not
fully complete yet some promissing projects are already well under way.
One of them being Chris Pyrgas' Vulcan IDE. It shows that you can already
easily use the the full .NET framework to create a complex system.
On VOPS you will also have the possibility to talk to Chris and others who
are using Vulcan daily to assist you during your learning process.
CU
Patrick
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Thomas Venus
2006-10-10 09:13:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which
I've to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new
projects which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large
projects and I must be sure, also to my customers, that support
I don't want to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it
ain't necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
Hi Janno,
I had the same problem as you.
My solution was to join VOPS and I must say it was the best move ever.
You get the latest builds of VO and Vulcan. Vulcan I did not really test
by now but the VO builds are great. The most stable we've ever had.
You can see and participate in the great progress these two products
make. If you or your company make money from your VO-written software
it is the most reasonable decision to pay those 850 EUR per year for
VOPS; it's worth every cent of it! There are a lot of software products
that require an annual fee for support so why not for a compiler. Also
the VOPS newsgroups are great. You get really help and support there,
without all those nonses postings here.
Just my opinion.
Thomas

--
GeorgeNT
2006-10-10 09:20:59 UTC
Permalink
Hi Janno,

the summer of 2005 I was at your position: to decide a move to C# or to
join the VOPS because the VO 2.7b (2740) had - first of all - some
serious problems using OCX's.

I decided to subscribe to VOPS (the second year just started) and I
found solutions to all rerious problems I had, plus I am evaluating the
Vulcan.NET using both the Crhis Pyrgas' VulcanIDE as well as the
VS2005.

I think the VO 2.8 will be the future of 32-bit language we love and
the Vulcan our smooth moving to the .NET world.
Into the VOPS you can see the progress of the projects day by day.

At your question now:
I am using VO 2.7 (using the last build available into VOPS) and my
applications use both MSSQL and MySQL via VO2ADO.

For the MySQL I am working using the version 5 via "MySQL-Connector
ODBC 3.51". And it works! The same application has the 2 SQL Servers as
alternatives and the differences in the code, mainly, is:
- the connection string
- the way to write the search queries when you use the IN (SELECT...)
clause for MySQL

Regards
George Theopoulos
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
GeorgeNT
2006-10-10 10:13:00 UTC
Permalink
There is a relative thread for VO and MySQL into this forum at Mars 29,
2006 named:
"MySQL 5.0"

Regards
George
Post by Patrick Vletter (Prive)
Hi Janno,
the summer of 2005 I was at your position: to decide a move to C# or to
join the VOPS because the VO 2.7b (2740) had - first of all - some
serious problems using OCX's.
I decided to subscribe to VOPS (the second year just started) and I
found solutions to all rerious problems I had, plus I am evaluating the
Vulcan.NET using both the Crhis Pyrgas' VulcanIDE as well as the
VS2005.
I think the VO 2.8 will be the future of 32-bit language we love and
the Vulcan our smooth moving to the .NET world.
Into the VOPS you can see the progress of the projects day by day.
I am using VO 2.7 (using the last build available into VOPS) and my
applications use both MSSQL and MySQL via VO2ADO.
For the MySQL I am working using the version 5 via "MySQL-Connector
ODBC 3.51". And it works! The same application has the 2 SQL Servers as
- the connection string
- the way to write the search queries when you use the IN (SELECT...)
clause for MySQL
Regards
George Theopoulos
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
GeorgeNT
2006-10-10 10:13:37 UTC
Permalink
There is a relative thread for VO and MySQL into this forum at Mars 29,
2006 named:
"MySQL 5.0"

Regards
George
Post by Patrick Vletter (Prive)
Hi Janno,
the summer of 2005 I was at your position: to decide a move to C# or to
join the VOPS because the VO 2.7b (2740) had - first of all - some
serious problems using OCX's.
I decided to subscribe to VOPS (the second year just started) and I
found solutions to all rerious problems I had, plus I am evaluating the
Vulcan.NET using both the Crhis Pyrgas' VulcanIDE as well as the
VS2005.
I think the VO 2.8 will be the future of 32-bit language we love and
the Vulcan our smooth moving to the .NET world.
Into the VOPS you can see the progress of the projects day by day.
I am using VO 2.7 (using the last build available into VOPS) and my
applications use both MSSQL and MySQL via VO2ADO.
For the MySQL I am working using the version 5 via "MySQL-Connector
ODBC 3.51". And it works! The same application has the 2 SQL Servers as
- the connection string
- the way to write the search queries when you use the IN (SELECT...)
clause for MySQL
Regards
George Theopoulos
Post by MagicFingers
Hi,
I'm an experienced VO Programmer since release VO 1.0b. But I'm a
little bit worried about the future of VO because the last update to
VO2.7b was in the end of 2004. I've got a few large projects which I've
to maintain for the next 3-5 years but also a bunch of new projects
which I've to start in early 2007. These are pretty large projects and
I must be sure, also to my customers, that support and/or new
development will stay in place for VO. On the other hand: I don't want
to throw away my large library of selfmade classes if it ain't
necessary.
What do you think I should do? Buy Vulcan.NET to be sure for the next
few years or is there another good alternative/successor of our
beautiful VO language?
best regards,
Janno Hordijk
MagicServices
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